A List Of Must-Have Graphic Novels For Any School Library

On October 12, 2013 · 2 Comments

This is by no means a comprehensive list – I haven’t read everything out there! And there are plenty I’ve read that I’m probably forgetting at the moment. But librarians ask me often enough for graphic novel recommendations that it seemed worthwhile to compile a list.

These are all graphic novels that I’ve personally read and enjoyed. They all have genuinely top-notch cartooning, and I’m confident kids will enjoy them. I’ve tried to make a list that includes both “obvious” graphic novels, and lesser-known works that are nonetheless excellent and entertaining.

Some graphic novels for all ages.

  1. Bone, by Jeff Smith.
  2. Smile , by Raina Telgemeier.
  3. And also Drama, by Raina Telgemeier. Raina’s books are magic; she has a direct portal from her drawing board to the hearts of young girls everywhere. It’s uncanny.
  4. Beanworld, by Larry Marder.
  5. American Born Chinese by Gene Lee Yang
  6. Inuyasha, by Rumiko Takahashi.
  7. Castle Waiting, by Linda Medley. I love both Castle Waiting books; fantasy that emphasizes friendship and humor rather than danger and daring, and somehow is fascinating rather than cloying. Plus, no one draws castle architecture better than Linda Medley.
  8. Rapunzel’s Revenge, by Shannon Hale and Nathan Hale.
  9. Courtney Crumrin, for those kids who like stories that are gently macabre.
  10. Jellaby, by Kean Soo. Out of print, as is the sequel, but available secondhand and worth it; sweet and unique.
  11. Meanwhile, by Jason Shiga. A completely fresh take on the choose-your-own-adventure genre.
  12. Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales, by Nathan Hale.
  13. Amulet, by Kazu Kibuishi
  14. A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel, amazingly well adapted by Hope Larson from Madeleine L’Engle’s novel. I’m not generally favorably inclined towards adaptations, but this one is an exception.
  15. Yotsuba&! by Kiyohiko Azuma.
  16. Zita the Spacegirl, by Ben Hatke.
  17. Friends with Boys, by Faith Erin Hicks.
  18. Babymouse, by Jennifer Holm and Matthew Holm. (Okay, this one isn’t “all-ages,” it’s for little kids.)
  19. Amy Unbounded, by Rachel Hartman.This is a “hidden gem,” long out of print and available only used. A fantasy comic full of accurate details about the daily life of a bright ten-year-old girl in the middle ages.
  20. The Baby-Sitters Club, by Ann M Martin and Raina Telgemeier. I normally tend to recommend more “indy” titles, but the charm and excellent cartooning in these three books is irresistible.

Superhero Graphic Novels. Gotta have a few of ’em, I guess. Other than Superhero Girl and Supergirl, these are for older kids rather than all-ages.

  1. The Adventures of Superhero Girl, by Faith Erin Hicks. More of a parody of superheros than a standard superhero book, this one can be enjoyed by both superhero fans and superhero skeptics, and contains no grimness and next to no violence.
  2. Supergirl: Cosmic Adventures in the 8th Grade, by Landry Walker and Eric Jones. This graphic novel, about an 8th grade Supergirl trying to find her way through school and through superheroing, is just ridiculously fun. There’s a little superhero violence, but nothing gory or brutal, and the theme of a misfit struggling to fit in will be relatable for many middle schoolers.
  3. Zot!: The Complete Black and White Collection, by Scott McCloud. This is my favorite superhero comic. It is optimistic rather than grim, and although it has moments of intense adventure it’s not especially violent. A teen coming-of-age novel in superhero form, the hero’s girlfriend Jenny is at least as much the protagonist as Zot himself is. There’s an earlier color Zot! book, which I also like, but the black-and-white book is better and can be read on its own.
  4. Runaways, by Brian K. Vaughan, Adrian Alphona, Joss Whedon and Michael Ryan. Fun superhero action with a diverse cast of main characters. Like most superhero comics, Runaways can get rather grim and violent; there are betrayals and some characters die. I only recommend the first eight volumes, after that the quality plummets.
  5. Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. THE classic of the superhero genre, much better than the movie of the same name. WARNING: Extreme grimness and violence, and some sexual scenes depicted non-explicitly, including one panel depicting a rape.
  6. Batman, Year One, by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli. If you’re going to stock just one Batman graphic novel, this is the one. Christopher Nolan clearly kept this book by his bedside while he was making “Batman Begins,” but the version on paper is much better. Grim and violent, however.

Graphic Novels For Older Kids – books with death, tougher themes, etc..

  1. Incognegro, by Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece.
  2. Maus, by Art Spiegleman.
  3. Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi.
  4. I Kill Giants, by Joe Kelly and J.M. Ken Nimura. (Might be okay for middle school kids, too. I need to reread it to see. But it has some tough themes about bullying and trauma, so I’m putting it here for now).
  5. Anya’s Ghost, by Vera Brosgol. WARNING: The main character – who is wonderfully written – smokes and swears. (Although I think she quits smoking by the end of the book).
  6. Aya, by Marguerite Abouet. As well as being a gorgeous comic book, this is the one of the best portraits of daily life in Africa (specifically, the Ivory Coast) you’ll ever read.  Again, might be okay for middle schoolers, but I’d have to reread to be sure.
  7. The Tale of One Bad Rat by Bryan Talbot. Excellent graphic novel about a girl recovering from sexual abuse.
  8. Ivy, by Sarah Oleksyk. WARNING: This book contains R-rated nudity, sex, drug use, and swearing, so may not be for every library, despite its high quality. A realistic coming-of-age novel about a young girl and wannabe artist.
  9. Understanding Comics, by Scott McCloud. An entertaining comic book textbook about the medium of comic books, this won’t appeal to all kids, but the intellectual nerdy comic book fan types may dig it.
  10. Making Comics, by Scott McCloud. This is the book I recommend to high schoolers who are beginning to get serious about making their own comics and want to know what they should read.

Some All-Age Classics

  1. Pogo, by Walt Kelly
  2. Peanuts, by Charles Schulz
  3. Uncle Scrooge, by Carl Barks
  4. Calvin and Hobbes, by Bill Watterson
  5. The Adventures of Tintin: Red Rackham’s Treasure ) and…
  6. The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn, both by Hergé. Normally I don’t recommend particular books within a series, but if you get only 2 Tintin books, get these two (which form a single two-part story). They’re both an example of Hergé’s cartooning at its best, and also an example of a Hergé book without any offensive racial stereotypes to worry about. (Although one character is an alcoholic.)
  7. Moomin, by Tove Jansson.

And hey, while you’re at it, please consider picking up a copy of Hereville. :-p

I will be appearing at Puyallup Mini-Con This Saturday!

On September 28, 2013 · 0 Comments

It’s a free event! And I’m doing a presentation of my own at 3pm. Please come say hi if you’re in the area.


Sketch: Mirka and Layele dancing

On September 2, 2013 · 0 Comments

Layele is one of Mirka’s sisters, and is about 6 years old. She really didn’t appear much in books 1 or 2, but is a major character in book 3.

One thing I’m trying to do is make a different sibling the “primary sidekick” in each Hereville book. So in book 1 the “primary” sibling character was Zindel, although Gittel and Rochel got some nice screen time too. In book 2 the “primary” sidekick was Rochel, and Zindel was present as well, but poor Gittel barely appeared. In book three, Layele will be the primary sidekick. I have an idea for a plotline in which Gittel is the primary sidekick – which would be interesting, since Gittel is older than Mirka and would try to assert authority over her – but that would be for a future book.

mirka-and-layele

Sketchbook: “Starface”

On August 23, 2013 · 0 Comments

2013-08-22

My newest sketchbook page, “Starface.”

I saw the “field of faces background” in another cartoonist’s drawing on Facebook and thought “I am definitely swiping that idea,” but now I can’t find the other cartoonist to credit her. Sorry, whoever you are.

Sketchbook page with a grumpy tongue

On August 11, 2013 · 0 Comments

2013-08-08

A fish from my sketchbook

On August 3, 2013 · 0 Comments

2013-08-01

Sketchbook scan

On July 29, 2013 · 0 Comments

2013-07-13

Deleted Scene With Mirka and her Mame from Hereville Book 3

On July 26, 2013 · 0 Comments

Here’s a scene that I ended up 90% rewriting, between a very small Mirka, years ago, and her Mom. I like this scene, but what I replaced it with fits better into the larger story.

These are what I call my “stick figure layouts,” where I don’t do any actual drawing, but I figure out the final script and the layout.

001-rejected

002-rejected

Under Previews, Process

Steven Bergson Interviews Me About Hereville 2

On July 12, 2013 · 0 Comments

superman-rocket-origin

It’s always fun being interviewed by Steven Bergson of Jewish Comics Blog, because he’s so prepared and knowledgeable. Here’s the first few questions from the interview he just posted:

Jewish Comics Blog : How has your life changed since wining the Sydney Taylor Book Award and having its sequel recognized as an SBTA Honor Book?

JCB : In my last interview with you, you told us to expect a wedding in the 2nd book. Yet, that wedding never materialized. Why did you change your mind and will we be seeing a wedding in a future Hereville book?

JCB : It has already been speculated by comix scholars that Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster may have been alluding to the Kindertransport when they had Superman‘s parents send him away from a world on the verge of destruction to the safe haven of Earth. This was mentioned in Harry Brod’s recent book Superman Is Jewish? In Hereville 2, you cleverly made a parallel between Mirka’s great-great-bubba’s journey from the Old Country to the New Country (presumably because of antisemitism, though that’s never mentioned) and the separation of the meteorite from her meteor sisters. Were you inspired at all by the Superman origin story?

To read my answers to these and Steven’s other questions, head on over to the Jewish Comics Blog.

Under CTA, Interviews

“AJL Reviews” on Hereville: How Mirka Met A Meteorite

On July 10, 2013 · 0 Comments

The latest issue of “AJL Reviews,” published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, includes a review of the second Hereville book! Here’s their concluding paragraph:

Fans of Hereville: How Mirka Got Her Sword, will not be disappointed in the latest installment. Deutsch’s illustrations are as quirky and engaging as Mirka herself. The artwork, done primarily in shades of green and orange, is fresh and visually stunning with a unique panel layout on each page. Like the first novel, Yiddish is sprinkled throughout the text and Jewish rituals are observed from an Orthodox point of view. Shabbat is lovingly portrayed as a sacred and spiritual time. Hereville is a unique setting for a fantasy, but it’s clear that it faces the same challenges as all communities when bullies threaten Mirka. Readers of all levels of observance will connect to the story, and its elements of fantasy will appeal to girls and boys. The powerful theme of accepting yourself as you are makes this book a winning choice for all libraries. Strongly recommended.

Thank you to Aimee Lurie, who wrote that review (and I’ve met her in person and she’s totally nice, too!).

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